Well I Guess This is Growing Up

AskArchive Twitter Journal Writings About Photography

"Find meaning. Distinguish melancholy from sadness. Go out for a walk. It doesn’t have to be a romantic walk in the park, spring at its most spectacular moment, flowers and smells and outstanding poetical imagery smoothly transferring you into another world. It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter. Do not be afraid of spending quality time by yourself. Find meaning or don’t find meaning but “steal” some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self. Opt for privacy and solitude. That doesn’t make you antisocial or cause you to reject the rest of the world. But you need to breathe. And you need to be."

"I, too, felt ready to start life all over again. It was as if that great rush of anger had washed me clean, emptied me of hope, and, gazing up at the dark sky spangled with its signs and stars, for the first time, the first, I laid my heart open to the benign indifference of the universe. To feel it so like myself, indeed, so brotherly, made me realize that I’d been happy, and that I was happy still."

- Albert Camus, The Stranger

The True Identity of Andy’s Mom In “Toy Story” Will Blow Your Mind | Jon Negroni

Probably the best Pixar conspiracy theory

"Only be with someone who you think you can learn from. They should be smarter than you in certain ways so that you can continue to grow and be interested. Above all, you should undoubtedly be proud that you are with them."

- something my 10th grade history teacher told me about how he knew he wanted to marry his wife  (via dingyfeathers)

(Source: mindtricks-, via thegirlwithabluehat)

It’s a beautiful thing when you love somebody

And I love somebody.

Maybe everything we go through so young in life is all about waiting for the person who you’re supposed spend the rest of our lives with. And the bigger picture is that every single mistake we make, person we encounter, and every hardship we go through brings us exactly where we are supposed to be.

a-kent:

I really appreciate the placement of these characters and how it captures the balance of their relationship.
John and Sherlock are in the foreground, the focus of the conversation, and yet Mary is still a very prominent part of the relationship. She’s dressed in a manner that complements then. Though she is (figuratively) between them, she is not an obstruction. She does not interrupt the linked gaze between the men at all, but is not relegated to the background either.
Her gaze is on John; she’s not treating Sherlock as the interloper but follows his gaze; she bridges the gap between them even though she is only linked to John (at this point of the narrative).
Though her role in the series is as yet unclear, it is undeniable that she helps John get over his rightful resentment. The fact that she likes Sherlock is probably the cherry on top.

"

You want a physicist to speak at your funeral. You want the physicist to talk to your grieving family about the conservation of energy, so they will understand that your energy has not died. You want the physicist to remind your sobbing mother about the first law of thermodynamics; that no energy gets created in the universe, and none is destroyed. You want your mother to know that all your energy, every vibration, every Btu of heat, every wave of every particle that was her beloved child remains with her in this world. You want the physicist to tell your weeping father that amid energies of the cosmos, you gave as good as you got.

And at one point you’d hope that the physicist would step down from the pulpit and walk to your brokenhearted spouse there in the pew and tell him that all the photons that ever bounced off your face, all the particles whose paths were interrupted by your smile, by the touch of your hair, hundreds of trillions of particles, have raced off like children, their ways forever changed by you. And as your widow rocks in the arms of a loving family, may the physicist let her know that all the photons that bounced from you were gathered in the particle detectors that are her eyes, that those photons created within her constellations of electromagnetically charged neurons whose energy will go on forever.

And the physicist will remind the congregation of how much of all our energy is given off as heat. There may be a few fanning themselves with their programs as he says it. And he will tell them that the warmth that flowed through you in life is still here, still part of all that we are, even as we who mourn continue the heat of our own lives.

And you’ll want the physicist to explain to those who loved you that they need not have faith; indeed, they should not have faith. Let them know that they can measure, that scientists have measured precisely the conservation of energy and found it accurate, verifiable and consistent across space and time. You can hope your family will examine the evidence and satisfy themselves that the science is sound and that they’ll be comforted to know your energy’s still around. According to the law of the conservation of energy, not a bit of you is gone; you’re just less orderly. Amen.

"

- Aaron Freeman

"You’re the Cory to my Topanga."

- bbk

If, for some godforsaken reason, we don’t work out…

We would be my most beautiful failure.

"Bay Poem from Berkeley" by Sandra Cisneros

Mornings I still
reach for you before
opening my eyes.

An antique habit from
last summer when we pulled
each other into the heat of groin
and belly, slept with an arm
around the other.

The Texas sun was like that.
Like a body asleep beside you.

But when I open my eyes
to the flannel and down,
mist at the window and blue
light from the bay, I remember
where I am.

This weight
on the other side of the bed
is only books, not you. What
I said I loved more than you.
True.

Though these mornings
I wish books loved back.

"You know when sometimes you meet someone so beautiful — and then you actually talk to them and five minutes later they’re as dull as a brick; but then there’s other people. And you meet them and you think, “Not bad, they’re okay,” and when you get to know them … their face just, sort of, becomes them, like their personality’s written all over it, and they just — they turn into something so beautiful."

- Amy Pond, Doctor Who